Woman Rids Body of Cancer in 4 Months Using Cannabis Oil

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Medical doctors and healthcare personnel alike are stymied by the miraculous cure which recently occurred to Michelle Aldrich who suffered from a deadly form of lung cancer.

Michelle was sixty-six years old at the time. Initially she developed a low-grade fever and cough which she couldn’t shake. Several months later it worsened; she developed signs of a pneumonia which prompted her to seek medical care. Her doctor ordered a CT scan trying to determine what the problem was. The scan revealed a large mass in the central region of the chest consistent with lung cancer.

NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER (NSCLC)

Unfortunately the biopsy and staging of the tumor revealed it to be poorly differentiated, non-small cell lung cancer (adenocarcinoma) or NSCLC for short, stage three. All lung cancers carry a poor prognosis but this form is particularly aggressive. From the National Cancer Institute:

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE:

General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) NSCLC is any type of epithelial lung cancer other than small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The most common types of NSCLC are squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma, but there are several other types that occur less frequently, and all types can occur in unusual histologic variants. Although NSCLCs are associated with cigarette smoke, adenocarcinomas may be found in patients who have never smoked. As a class, NSCLCs are relatively insensitive to chemotherapy and radiation therapy compared with SCLC. Patients with resectable disease may be cured by surgery or surgery followed by chemotherapy. Local control can be achieved with radiation therapy in a large number of patients with unresectable disease, but cure is seen only in a small number of patients. Patients with locally advanced unresectable disease may achieve long-term survival with radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy. Patients with advanced metastatic disease may achieve improved survival and palliation of symptoms with chemotherapy, targeted agents, and other supportive measures.